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Archive for the ‘nature’ Category

There are so many quilts that haven’t made it into this blog! I’ll post a few photos now to try and make up for some lost time.

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I blogged about this one here. It was a wedding gift for one of my nephews, and title I gave it in the end is “heart and soul mates”. The way I arranged the HSTs (half-square triangles) symbolizes two people coming together and creating something new.

img_3301This one is called “Line and Texture”. The pattern can be found in a book titled “In Love with Squares and Rectangles” by Amy Walsh and Janine Burke. My colour palette was inspired by the Jinny Beyer fabric that I used for the binding. My mother had bought a tremendous amount of this discarded 2″ trim when she visited Suttles & Seawinds in Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia years ago. It’s going to take me a long time to use it all up!

img_3663Here’s another wedding quilt (couch quilt size) that I made for a niece who is a jazz musician. I had only bought a fat quarter of the feature fabric – with her in mind – but I was able to create a modern quilt, using coordinating fabrics from my stash and focusing on lots of negative space. I got the idea for this quilt by googling modern quilt ideas. Here’s the page I found, and I just made up my own measurements based on the optimum block size for the “jazz cats” imagery (actually called “Cool Cats” by Amy Boyajian/Lilla Rogers Studio for P & B Textiles).

fullsizeoutput_44My Marvellous Mythical Moth was started in a workshop with the talented Susan Carlson. I love her fabric collage technique! It is a small piece (20.5″ w x 16″ h) that was a lot of fun to put together.

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The natural world has it all: colours, patterns, designs, shapes, repeats. I am convinced that even if something doesn’t enter your consciousness the moment you encounter it, your psyche still has a chance to tuck it away for later reference. I often use my camera (rather than my mind’s eye) to capture a pattern or colour combination that attracts my attention.

water currents - light and shadow patterns

water currents – light and shadow patterns

pattern in tree bark

subtle colour and pattern of tree bark

an intricate design on the underside of the butterfly wing

an intricate design on the underside of the butterfly’s wing

circular pattern - a spiral in the centre of the flower

a spiral pattern in the centre of a sunflower

 

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It is a wholesome and necessary thing for us to turn again to the earth, and in the contemplation of her beauties to know of wonder and humility.

~ Rachel Carson

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Christmas Eve

As Toronto bravely makes its way through a terrible ice storm, and I prepare to step gingerly across the icy sidewalks to get to the subway to get to work for the last time this year, I am thinking about the frailty of life. All the connections in this great big city – seen and unseen – some working and some faltering – affected by a confluence of weather conditions that we can’t control.

Peace to all on this Christmas Eve.

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Wordless Wednesday

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It’s been awhile since I last posted. Life’s been extra busy, it seems. I’ve been working away at the wall hanging that I created at Dwayne Wanner’s 3-part workshop, and I don’t want to blog about it until I get a good photo of the finished product! It’s quite a departure from my “usual” style (if there is such a thing) but you’ll have to be patient.

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Hiking near Skinners Bluff on the Bruce Trail on the long weekend in May.

I have been enjoying the change of seasons, to some extent. I did some camping with my sons, hiking with my sister, joined some nature walks with the Toronto Field Naturalists and have been up to the family cottage a couple of times this spring.

Right now it is beastly hot and humid.

I’ve  recently added this blog to Bloglovin, so feel free to add me to your favourites there!

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I just finished two small quilts that were distracting me from some more extensive projects that I have on the go. Pleasant distractions, I must say!

In Transit II

In Transit II
32″ x 14″

The first is a commission that resulted from my donation to the United Way fundraiser (silent auction) at my workplace last December. My colleague Jennifer told me that she missed out at the last minute when someone else out-bid her for my “In Transit” quilt.

She asked whether I would make one for her. I hesitated a bit, because this was during the lead-up to Christmas, and I wasn’t ready to take on anything with a deadline attached to it. But she said I could have all the time I wanted, so I agreed. I zeroed in on the theme for “In Transit”, city transportation, because I work for Metrolinx, the regional transportation agency for Ontario.

Most of the fabrics depict the different transportation modes and city scenes. I let those fabrics dictate the colour choices, pulling complimentary colours from my stash.

Closeup of In Transit II

Closeup of In Transit II

I went out looking specifically for one additional fabric, because Jennifer is an avid cyclist. I walked into one of my local quilt stores and found this fabric – Cruzin by Barbara Jones of QuiltSoup for Henry Glass. It didn’t really matter that it was the ONLY bicycle-themed fabric they had, because the colours fit perfectly into my scheme!

My  quilt label

My quilt label

Jennifer was thrilled with In Transit II, and she was even impressed with my choice of backing fabric, which we both think evokes a cityscape at night.

My second finish is a “cobblestones” quilt, which I attribute to my discovery of Wanda Hanson’s Exuberant Color website. It’s made entirely from batik scraps (except for the backing). There are even two fabrics that are clothing scraps (one from a pair of pants I shortened, and some leftovers from a blouse I made a about two decades ago). I have titled it “Undertones”.

Undertones

Undertones
26.5″ x 21.5″

For this one, I was able to piece together scraps of batting too, further evidence that I am a frugal quilter.

I puzzled for a while over how I wanted to quilt it, and ended up tapping into my “organic process” – that is, just listening to my intuition and using circles and unwinding spirals to compliment the nature-themed batiks.

With these pieces finished and labeled, I have returned to my Amish Pinwheel summer coverlet project. I have six blocks done (it takes me about an hour for each one, including cutting the fabrics).

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